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He himself / Calls her a non pareil." [play; Pocahontas-like] [Electronic Version] Alexander, William, Earl of Stirling [Stirling, William Alexander]. London, 1630.) In a survey of New World colonization associated with his grant in Newfoundland, Alexander cites the marriage of Rolfe and Pocahontas as evidence of the value of intermarriage, "for it is the onely course that vniting minds, free from jealousies, can first make strangers confide in a new friendship." Smith, John. Illustrations by Simon Van de Passe (see 1616) and Robert Vaughan (see below).

[Electronic Version] informs potential readers that Powhatan's "daughter saved his life, sent him to James towne and releeved him and all the English" -- the second verifiably public reference by Smith to the fabled rescue from captivity. as a "Nonpareil": "And that most deeply to consider is / The beauty of his daughter. "The Epistle Dedicatory" to the Duchess of Richmond and Lenox, 40, 49 [2], 50 [2], 54 [2], 67, 77, 80, 105, 112, 113, 119, 121-23.

The worst of thatt plantation is past, for our men are well victualled by there owne industrie, but yet no profit is retourned." Smith, John.

Letter of June 20, 1616: "Sir Thomas Dale retourned frome Virginia; he hathe brought divers men and women of thatt countrye to be educated here, and one Rollfe, who maried a daughter of Pohetan, (the barbarous prince,) called Pocahuntas, hathe brought his wife withe him into England.

, London, 1625.) The Pocahontas story is further updated here in the 3rd.

"with her tricking up and high stile and titles you might thincke her and her worshipfull husband to be somebody," if you did not know they were supported by the poverty-stricken Virginia Company.

Most importantly, Purchas also reports from personal experience that in London Pocahontas "carried her selfe as the Daughter of a King" and, in his presence, was accorded respect by the Bishop of London (p. Smith's verbatim reference to Pocahontas from the 1622 . If this letter is genuine, it contains the first description of "the" rescue, though there is no indication it was publicly known in 1616. In it, we learn that Pocahontas (now described as "a child of twelve or thirteen years of age" when he knew her) not only rescued Smith more than once but was instrumental in saving the entire colony from starvation. (Richmond: Virginia State Library Press, 1957, with introduction by A. Rowse.) (New York: Da Capo Press, 1971.) Letter of June 18, 1614, by the governor of Virginia, who recounts an unsuccessful voyage to Powhatan to negotiate the ransom of Pocahontas and also his role in her conversion to Christianity, a conversion that preceded her marriage to Rolfe, which, in turn, precipitated a period of peace. There's more detail about Smith's captivity but still without reference to Pocahontas, for he procures his own liberty: "Smith, with two others, were beset by 200 savages his men slain, & himselfe in a quagmire taken prisoner; but after a moneth he procured himselfe not onely libertie, but great admiration amongst them, and returning, once more stayed the Pinace from flight." Pocahontas's abduction -- just lately happened -- is noted: "they took Pocahuntis (Powhatans deerest daughter) prisoner, and for her ransome had Corne, and redeliverie of their prisoners and weapons." [Virginia history] [Electronic Version] Rolfe, John.